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Program Highlights

Three-Atom Thick Fabrics Made by Seamless Stitching of Single-Layer Crystals

Research

Joining different materials can lead to all kinds of breakthroughs. In electronics, this produces heterojunctions — the most fundamental components in solar cells and computer chips. The smoother the seam between two materials, the better the electronic devices will function.

(2018)

Using Math to Search for a 'Needle in a Haystack' to Make Better Solar Cells

Research

CCMR researchers have used mathematical methods, typically used in business forecasting, to suggest which combination of components will make the best solar cell materials in a “perovskite” arrangement. These materials are made in solution, essentially in a beaker, at room temperature. This makes them far more energy-conservative than traditional silicon solar cells.

(2018)

Threading Atom-Wide Wires Into 2D Materials

Cornell University researchers and collaborators have discovered – somewhat accidentally – a method for inserting a one-dimensional (1D) semiconductor channel into the “fabric” of a material that is only a few atoms thick.

(2018)

Through the Atomic Scale Looking Glass

Research

In Through the Looking Glass, Alice steps through a mirror into a world in which everything is its mirror image. Realizing that writing in books is reversed, Alice wonders what has happened on the atomic scale. 

(2017)

Simple stretch “flips” the sign of charge carriers

Research
Electricity is the flow of charged particles through a material, such as a wire — a process that resembles a river of water molecules flowing through a canyon. But are the charged particles positive or negative?
(2017)

Imaging Magnetic and Electric Fields with an Electron Microscope

Research
Imaging Magnetic and Electric Fields with an Electron Microscope

A new high-speed detector for electron microscopes uses every transmitted electron to measure electric and magnetic fields

(2016)

New property of electrons may lead to novel electronic devices

Research

New property of electrons may lead to novel electronic devices

(2015)

“Shaken, not stirred”: Spin controlled with mechanical vibration

Research
Spin resonance in diamond using a MEMS resonator
(2014)

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