Skip to content Skip to navigation

News

April 5, 2018

At the recent American Physical Society (APS) March meeting in Los Angeles, more than 100 attendees stopped by the NSF MRSEC booth to learn more about this interdisciplinary program.  Close to 50 volunteers representing 16 of the 20 Centers helped answer questions that ranged from “What is the MRSEC?” and “What are the benefits of being involved?” to “How do students become part of the program?

March 16, 2018

January 17, 2018

The MRSEC demographic survey allows NSF to collect information on whether the agency's funding reaches a diverse set of researchers. Starting in 2018, we will implement an enhanced survey platform. Below, we have provided a list of frequently asked questions regarding this annual survey. 

December 11, 2017

NSF invites eligible organizations to submit research proposals that inform, create, implement, and evaluate models of intervention that will advance the knowledge base for establishing and retaining underrepresented minorities in STEM fields with particular attention to life science and the biosciences. 

November 28, 2017
Penn Researchers Establish Universal Signature Fundamental to How Glassy Materials Fail
September 27, 2017

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is one of DMR’s newest MRSECs. This NSF-funded $15.5 million research center is designed to bring eight departments together to study innovative materials.

September 25, 2017

Materials Research Science and Engineering Centers are supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to undertake materials research of scope and complexity that would not be feasible under traditional funding of individual research projects.

September 19, 2017

The National Science Foundation has awarded funding to eight Materials Research Science and Engineering Centers (MRSECs) for transdisciplinary work that covers all areas of materials science and helps foster collaborations on a national and international level. These six-year awards represent a significant new investment in material science exceeding $145M.

July 20, 2017

Some cotton candy machines can do more than simply satisfy a sweet tooth. Researchers at Harvard and Vanderbilt University have discovered a way for the machines to spin new fibers that could potentially contribute to life-saving technologies such as regrowing human tissue or inventing lighter bullet proof vests.

Pages