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An Ultrafast Camera for Transmission Electron Microscopy

An image acquired on a prototype ultrafast camera capable of acquiring images in 200 microseconds. The image shows a metallic glass nanowire, heated inside the microscope into the liquid state so the atoms start to move.

The Wisconsin MRSEC has launched development of an ultrafast camera for transmission electron microscopy (TEM), in partnership with Direct Electron, Inc., a US-based small business.

Current TEM cameras acquire images in a few milliseconds. The new camera will ultimately acquire images in just 8 microseconds, which will enable researchers to study fast processes in materials like atoms rearranging in a flowing liquid and to probe the smallest structures in materials – which types of atoms sit next to each other and how they arranged in space.

The camera and TEM are available to researchers nationwide through the Materials Research Facility Network, which brings together research infrastructure across the MRSEC program.